The watch that stops second and second hand is different

- Apr 25, 2018-

The watch that stops second and second hand is different


The watch, pioneered by the chronograph, appeared in the second half of the 18th century with stop-second and second hand watches. They can measure shorter intervals but still lack the ability to return to zero.


The measurement of seconds and seconds is fairly early. In 1720, George Graham built a device with a pendulum that could beat in seconds, and its hands could be divided into four beats per second. When the second hand was added to the pocket watch in the 18th century, watchmakers began to look for ways to stop the second hand movement in order to measure the short intervals. Their initial solution was to stop the second hand movement. This is the principle behind Romilly's stop-second watch (1754), seen in diderot's encyclopaedia. The central pointer beats once per second. In 1776, the geneva-based jean-mo? Se Pouzait published a paper describing the principle of a watch with an independent second hand. An independent gear system allows the second hand to stop or start at will, independent of the mechanical device that drives the hour hand and minute hand. But because the second hand can't go to zero, the user still has to write down the start time and then calculate the time interval. The improvements to this device in the 19th century, and the invention of the resetting function, produced what we know today as the chronograph.